"Joan Miró: the color of my dreams" exhibition in Paris

From Oct 3, 2018 until Feb 2019, the Grand Palais is hosting an exceptional retrospective of Joan Miró, retracing the evolution of an artist at the forefront of the 20th century surrealist movement.

Miró's career represents nearly seven decades of creativity marked by constant renewal. This major retrospective is the first held at the Grand Palais since Miró's death in 1983.
Paintings and drawings, ceramics, sculptures, and illustrated books—some 150 essential works from major American and European museums, as well as private collections, will present a journey illustrating the pivotal moments in a fertile career full of twists and turns.

A taste for dreams

Fauvist, Cubist, then Detailist, the Catalan artist so passionate about color adhered very quickly to the Surrealist movement. He soon became one of the great masters, inventing a totally new style, nourished by his taste for the dream, where forms and signs hold mysterious signifcances.
Neither abstract nor figurative, his dreamlike world could turn violent, evidenced by the "wild" paintings of the 1930s at the height of the Civil War in Spain. They could also be soft, like with the Constellations, a series of small formats performed in Varangéville-sur-mer between 1940 and 1941 where his favorite creatures, women, stars, and birds dance. His work was a permanent dialogue with the dreams that he also pursued in his practice on ceramics and in his sculptures.

Outside the codes

As the last rooms dedicated to his last 25 years of creation show, the painter/poet pursued this perpetual quest for renewal until his death. For one who said he wanted to "assassinate the painting", Miró wanted above all to save the poetic essence, out of the codes imposed by the market and the history of art.
"For me, a painting must be like sparks," he said. "It must dazzle like the beauty of a woman or a poem."