Allez au contenu Allez à la navigation Allez à la recherche Change language

The Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, National Museum of Archaeology

Museums Sites and monuments Île-de-France Medieval / Renaissance

If you can not read the media, , download Flash Player.

  • The Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, National Museum of Archaeology

    The Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, National Museum of Archaeology

    © Mr Bidou / Flickr

  • The Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, National Museum of Archaeology

    The Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, National Museum of Archaeology

    © Hemis.fr

The Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, situated around 13 miles west of Paris, currently houses the magnificent National Museum of Archaeology. Prehistory, the Iron Age and Gaul unveil their secrets within an old-fashioned château, a long-time grand residence of the Kings of France. The garden terraces offer an amazing view of greater Paris.

The château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, also known as the“Château-Vieux” (Old Château) as opposed to the now departed “Château-Neuf “ (New Château), is a former residence of the Kings of France. The signing of many peace treaties and royal edicts took place in the grounds.

Located in the centre of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, today it is a National Museum of Archaeology.

National Museum of Archaeology

The museum exhibits around 30,000 archaeological objects, making it one of the most magnificent collections in Europe! These objects are divided into seven collections, which follow a chronological order: the Paleolithic Age, the Neolithic Age, the Bronze Age, the Iron Age, Roman Gaul and Merovingian Gaul (8th century), periods studied further within a hall of archaeology. Its reserve collections hold more than two million objects.

Chapelle Saint-Louis (The Saint-Louis Chapel)

The Saint-Louis chapel, which adjoins the château, is not to be missed. It is a masterpiece of classic gothic architecture. The ribs of the vault settle on small columns, reaching down to the ground, between the bays. Through its design and architecture, it is the foreshadow of the grand Sainte-Chapelle, which Saint Louis would later build within the walls of le Palais de la Cité (the City Palace) in Paris.

Grande terrasse (The Grand Terrace)

King Louis XIV enlisted André Le Nôtre to renovate the French gardens and the Grand Terrace. He also enlisted Charles Le Brun and Louis Le Vau, who remodelled his apartments in the Château-Vieux. In 1680, work began on the expansion of the château, through the construction of five corner wings, and was lead by Jules Hardouin-Mansart. In 1682 however, Louis XIV permanently left the château and moved to Versailles.